Treatment with TKIs can cause a widespread range of adverse events (AEs) such as rash, nausea, fatigue, headache, myelosuppression, cardiac AEs, and elevated liver enzymes.1

 

Chart: Common side effects pictured in a grid;- Increase risk of infection, skin rash, fatigue, bruising, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, nausea, headache, myelosuppression, cariovascular toxicity, elevated live enzymes.
 

  • It is important to monitor tolerance to treatment, as well as response, since AEs cannot only impact a patient’s wellbeing but also their motivation to adhere to treatment.2
  • Patients who self-report lower adherence, could prevent achievement of an optimal response to treatment.3
  • Despite managing AEs with dose reductions/interruptions, supportive care and concomitant medications, many patients treated with TKIs experience intolerance to treatment.4,5
1 in 5

Real-world data shows that >1 in 5 patients discontinue TKIs due to intolerance6

60_70 percent

44% patients required ≥1 TKI switch7

60_70 percent

21% switched more than once7
 

 

 

Even minor AEs can have major impacts

Although severe AEs may lead to drug discontinuation, hospitalisation, or death, even mild events can have a significant impact on patients’ quality of life.4,5 For example:

 

A PERSISTENT GRADE 2 DIARRHOEA COULD CAUSE SERIOUS DISRUPTION TO A PATIENT’S EVERYDAY LIFE.8

AES SUCH AS FATIGUE CAN SEVERELY IMPACT QUALITY OF LIFE OF PATIENTS.5

 

 

 

 

 

From the patient’s perspective

  • It is crucial you take your patient’s perspective when assessing symptom burden and overall quality of life, especially for those at later lines of treatment.
  • Clinicians and patients can see the way symptoms are reported quite differently.1
    • Clinicians can sometimes miss some of patients’ symptomatic AEs that may be less visible.
    • Widely used symptom-assessment questionnaires cannot capture the full impact of certain events, such as fatigue and overall symptom burden.
  • Patients may be suffering in silence, as these AEs limit activities central to daily life,8 such as personal care, performance at work, socialising with family and friends, or tackling household chores.8,9
  • A good start is to proactively ask patients about AEs arising from treatment and their impact on their daily routine (work, exercise, social and sexual activities).

 

See downloadable resources:

Encouraging Open Discussion with Your Patients About Symptoms

Eye graphic.
 
 

 

References:

  1. DeAngelo DJ, et al. Blood Cancer J. 2012 Oct;2(10):e95.
  2. Galinsky I, et al. J Adv Pract Oncol. 2012;3(4):225–236. 
  3. Boons CCLM, et al. Eur J Haematol. 2018;101:643–653. 
  4. Efficace F, et al. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2016;2016(1):170–179. 
  5. Cortes J, et al. J Hematol Oncol. 2021;14(1):44.
  6. Geelen IGP, et al. Haematologica. 2017;102:1842–1849.
  7. Milojkovic D, et al. Br J Haematol. 2021;192:62–74.
  8. Flynn KE, et al. Curr Hematol Malig Rep. 2016;11(2):80–85.
  9. Leukaemia Care. https://media.leukaemiacare.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Living-Well-with-C.... Accessed June 25, 2021.
Rate this content: 
No votes yet
UK | June 2021 | 122383
×

Ask Speakers

×

Medical Information Request

Adverse events should be reported. Reporting forms and information can be found at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. Adverse events should also be reported to Novartis via [email protected] or online through the pharmacovigilance intake (PVI) tool at www.report.novartis.com
If you have a question about the product, please contact Medical Information on 01276 698370 or by email at [email protected]