Prescribing information

 

Speaking at the 2019 Severe Asthma Masterclass, Prof. Alyn Morice discusses the relationship between oesophageal diseases, such as cough hypersensitivity syndrome, and the treatment of asthma.

 

 

Professor Alyn Morice, Hull

Professor Alyn Morice qualified at the University of Cambridge. He undertook research (MD) into the pharmacology of asthma at St Mary’s Hospital, and developed his interest in cough while a clinical lecturer at Addenbrooke's Hospital.

In 1989, Professor Morice was appointed as a senior lecturer in Sheffield, developing a pulmonary vascular service and the first UK Cough Clinic. In 1998, Professor Morice was appointed to the Foundation Chair in Respiratory Medicine at the University of Hull (now part of Hull York Medical School). He has led the European Respiratory Society and British Thoracic Society Task Forces on Cough.

 

 

*Xolair provides clinically meaningful improvements in quality of life for patients with severe allergic asthma.1

Indication2: Xolair should only be considered for patients with convincing IgE (immunoglobulin E) mediated asthma. In adults and adolescents (12 years of age and older): Xolair is indicated as add-on therapy to improve asthma control in patients with severe persistent allergic asthma who have a positive skin test or in vitro reactivity to a perennial aeroallergen and who have reduced lung function (FEV1 <80%) as well as frequent daytime symptoms or night-time awakenings and who have had multiple documented severe asthma exacerbations despite daily high-dose inhaled corticosteroids, plus a long-acting inhaled beta2-agonist. In children (6 to <12 years of age): Xolair is indicated as add-on therapy to improve asthma control in patients with severe persistent allergic asthma who have a positive skin test or in vitro reactivity to a perennial aeroallergen and frequent daytime symptoms or night-time awakenings and who have had multiple documented severe asthma exacerbations despite daily high-dose inhaled corticosteroids, plus a long-acting inhaled beta2-agonist.

FEV1, forced expiratory volume in 1 second; IgE, immunoglobulin E; SAA, severe allergic asthma.

References

  1. Braunstahl GJ et al. Resp Med 2013;107(8):1141–1151.
  2. Xolair® (omalizumab) Summary of Product Characteristics.
XSA20-C028(1) September 2020.
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