Prescribing information

 

In this 2020 webinar, Prof. Andrew Menzies-Gow discusses the lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic and how we can use these to improve severe asthma services in the future. This is followed by an expert panel discussion chaired by Dr Rob Niven and including Prof. Andrew Menzies-Gow, Rachel Stead and Dr Helen Hope.

 

 

Professor Andrew Menzies-Gow

Professor Andrew Menzies-Gow is the clinical lead for adult severe asthma and the director of the lung division at the Royal Brompton Hospital.

He is a Professor of practice (Respiratory medicine) at Imperial College, where his research interests include novel therapies for severe asthma. He chaired the NICE Guideline Development Group for Asthma: Diagnosis and Monitoring and is a member of the UK severe asthma network.

 

Dr Rob Niven

Dr Rob Niven is a senior lecturer and consultant respiratory physician at the University of Manchester and Manchester Foundation Trust. The severe asthma service in Manchester has grown to become arguably the largest service in Europe and has a hub role within the North West Network, with co-operative regional team MDT as its core successful outcome, and was a pioneer in this style of working in the severe asthma field.

As a researcher, he has published over 120 peer-reviewed papers and authored five book chapters. Dr Niven has innovated research into clinical practice in the fields of hypertonic saline for bronchiectasis as a therapy, awareness and diagnosis of dysfunctional breathing patterns, the role of antifungal therapy in severe asthma with fungal sensitisation and has been PI and CI on trials of bronchial thermoplasty and new biologics.

 

Rachel Stead

Rachel Stead is the lead asthma clinical nurse specialist at the Royal Brompton Hospital, where she has worked for five years. She has developed and expanded the Biologic service for over 500 patients, who are seen face to face and via virtual, nurse-led Biologic clinics for patients receiving homecare. She also takes part in the systematic assessment for refractory asthma clinic for new referrals and oversees the weekly Biologic multidisciplinary team meetings. Rachel is an independent nurse prescriber and undertaking an Msc in Advanced Clinical Practice at London South Bank University. 

 

Dr Helen Hope

Dr Helen Hope trained as a clinical psychologist at the University of Liverpool from 2010 to 2013, undertaking specialist placements in physical health services (Oncology, Cardiothoracic Transplant & HIV).  As a newly qualified clinical psychologist, she worked in the field of stroke and memory assessment, before finding her way into the respiratory Severe Asthma Service in 2014. Since then, she has established a clinical psychology service within the Manchester Severe Asthma Service, where she works with patients both on an individual and group level, utilising principles of Compassion Focused Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. 

 

 

*Xolair provides clinically meaningful improvements in quality of life for patients with severe allergic asthma.1

Indication2: Xolair should only be considered for patients with convincing IgE (immunoglobulin E) mediated asthma. In adults and adolescents (12 years of age and older): Xolair is indicated as add-on therapy to improve asthma control in patients with severe persistent allergic asthma who have a positive skin test or in vitro reactivity to a perennial aeroallergen and who have reduced lung function (FEV1 <80%) as well as frequent daytime symptoms or night-time awakenings and who have had multiple documented severe asthma exacerbations despite daily high-dose inhaled corticosteroids, plus a long-acting inhaled beta2-agonist. In children (6 to <12 years of age): Xolair is indicated as add-on therapy to improve asthma control in patients with severe persistent allergic asthma who have a positive skin test or in vitro reactivity to a perennial aeroallergen and frequent daytime symptoms or night-time awakenings and who have had multiple documented severe asthma exacerbations despite daily high-dose inhaled corticosteroids, plus a long-acting inhaled beta2-agonist.

FEV1, forced expiratory volume in 1 second; IgE, immunoglobulin E; SAA, severe allergic asthma.

References

  1. Braunstahl GJ et al. Resp Med 2013;107(8):1141–1151.
  2. Xolair® (omalizumab) Summary of Product Characteristics.
XSA20-C028(1) September 2020.
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