Prescribing information

 

Speaking at the 2019 Paediatric Severe Asthma Masterclass, Dr Clare Murray discusses the role of allergen exposure in children with asthma, and whether avoidance strategies can be used to improve asthma control.

 

Dr Clare Murray, Manchester

Dr Clare Murray qualified from the University of Edinburgh, and trained as a paediatrician, specialising in respiratory paediatrics. She is a senior lecturer at the University of Manchester and a consultant in paediatric respiratory medicine at the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital.

In 1999–2001, Dr Murray undertook research (MD) on environmental allergens and childhood asthma. She has worked on the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study and in 2015 became the chief investigator of the study. Her other research interests include treatment of asthma (both pharmacological and non-pharmacological), severe asthma and asthma diagnosis.

 

 

*Xolair provides clinically meaningful improvements in quality of life for patients with severe allergic asthma.1

Indication2: Xolair should only be considered for patients with convincing IgE (immunoglobulin E) mediated asthma. In adults and adolescents (12 years of age and older): Xolair is indicated as add-on therapy to improve asthma control in patients with severe persistent allergic asthma who have a positive skin test or in vitro reactivity to a perennial aeroallergen and who have reduced lung function (FEV1 <80%) as well as frequent daytime symptoms or night-time awakenings and who have had multiple documented severe asthma exacerbations despite daily high-dose inhaled corticosteroids, plus a long-acting inhaled beta2-agonist. In children (6 to <12 years of age): Xolair is indicated as add-on therapy to improve asthma control in patients with severe persistent allergic asthma who have a positive skin test or in vitro reactivity to a perennial aeroallergen and frequent daytime symptoms or night-time awakenings and who have had multiple documented severe asthma exacerbations despite daily high-dose inhaled corticosteroids, plus a long-acting inhaled beta2-agonist.

FEV1, forced expiratory volume in 1 second; IgE, immunoglobulin E; SAA, severe allergic asthma.

References

  1. Braunstahl GJ et al. Resp Med 2013;107(8):1141–1151.
  2. Xolair® (omalizumab) Summary of Product Characteristics.
XSA20-C028(1) September 2020.
×

Ask Speakers

×

Medical Information Request

Adverse events should be reported. Reporting forms and information can be found at yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk. Adverse events should also be reported to Novartis via [email protected] or online through the patient safety information (PSI) tool at https://psi.novartis.com
If you have a question about the product, please contact Medical Information on 01276 692255 or by email at [email protected]