What are NETs?

There are many types of cells located throughout the body. One particular group of cells are known as neuroendocrine cells. These cells are unique because they can regulate both the nervous system and the endocrine (glands in the body that make and release hormones into the bloodstream) system. If the neuroendocrine cells start to grow out of control, cancerous cells begin to grow over time. Neuroendocrine tumours are one of these cancers. Doctors sometimes refer to them as GEP-NETs (gastro-enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours) because they often arise in the cells of the stomach (gastro), intestines (entero) and the pancreas.

What are the symptoms of NETs?

The symptoms associated with active NETs are subtle and can be common to other types of gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. These symptoms are often vague and it can be difficult to determine the cause. Common symptoms of inactive NETs include abdominal pain, constipation, abdominal swelling and rectal bleeding.

What are the treatment options?

The type of treatment you receive will depend on the size and position of the tumour and whether it has spread. There are a range of treatment options your doctor will consider. Treatment options include surgery, drug treatments, chemotherapy, or radionuclide therapy. These medical treatments will help control the growth of the tumour or to help alleviate the symptoms caused by it.

 

What is acromegaly?

Acromegaly is a rare condition affecting only 83 people in every million. 

Acromegaly is caused by too much release of growth hormone being made by your pituitary gland, usually due to a non-cancerous growth. Your pituitary gland is a small gland that sits just below the brain, behind the eyes. Your pituitary gland controls normal growth, chemical reactions and reproductive activity.

Over time, too much growth hormone leads to changes in both your physical appearance and general health.

What are the symptoms of acromegaly?

Symptoms of patients with acromegaly include enlarged facial features (e.g. forehead, nose, lips), joint pain, tiredness and difficulty sleeping, numbness and weakness in your hands and headaches.

What are the treatment options?

There are a range of treatment options your doctor will consider. Treatment options include non-drug therapy or drug therapy. Effective treatment can improve or reverse some of the early signs and symptoms you may experience.

 

More information

For more information about SANDOSTATIN® LAR® please consult:

Summary of product characteristics (SmPC) for SANDOSTATIN® LAR®
This link will take you to the electronic medicines compendium (emc) website, which is a non-Novartis website.

Patient information leaflet (PIL) for SANDOSTATIN® LAR®
This link will take you to the electronic medicines compendium (emc) website, which is a non-Novartis website.

 

Reference

  1. SANDOSTATIN® LAR® Summary of Product Characteristics. December 2020.
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UK | May 2021 | 104726
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